Oxford Brookes University Physiotherapy

October 31, 2017
Oxford Brookes University

Carolyn graduated from the Leeds school of Physiotherapy. After completing her junior rotations in Newcastle she specialised in respiratory care in Nottingham, and then Cardiothoracics at the Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Trust. After 10 years of clinical teaching, Carolyn made her first move into education in 1998, employed as a Lecturer Practitioner between the Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Trust and the University of Hertfordshire. In 1999 Carolyn moved into full time education at the University of Hertfordshire and began her Doctoral studies. Carolyn moved to Oxford Brookes University in 2001, completing her Doctorate in 2003. Carolyn was the Programme Lead for the BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy programme at Oxford Brookes from 2005 until 2015 and the MSc Physiotherapy (Pre-Registration) since it began in September 2012 until 2015. Carolyn became the Head of Sport and Health Sciences at Oxford Brookes University in April 2015.

Membership of Professional Bodies

Health and Care Professions Council
Chartered Society of Physiotherapy

Teaching/Research interests

Carolyn’s research interests include inequality in higher education, in particular in physiotherapy undergraduate education.

Chapters in Books

Mason, C., How I Theorised my Thesis In: Wellington, J., Bathmaker, A. M., Hunt, C., McCulloch, G., and Sykes, P. (2005). Succeeding in Writing your Doctorate. Sage, London.

The Pathophysiology and Physiotherapy Management of Respiratory Disorders In: Shamley, D., (2003), Clinical Physiology in Rehabilitation. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann.

Peer Reviewed Papers

Mason, C., and Sparkes, V. J. (2002). Widening Participation in Physiotherapy Education. Part 1: Introduction. Physiotherapy, 88 (5), pp.273-275.

Mason, C., and Sparkes, V. J. (2002). Widening Participation in Physiotherapy Education. Part 2: Ethnicity among undergraduates. Physiotherapy, 88 (5), pp.276-284.

Sparkes, V. J., and Mason, C., (2002). Widening Participation in Physiotherapy Education. Part 3: Mature students in undergraduate education. Physiotherapy, 88 (5), pp.273-275.

Source: www.shs.brookes.ac.uk
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